Brochures

Longleaf Pine Silviculture
Longleaf Pine Silviculture

“the scientific management of forests for the continuous production of goods and services,” Silviculture is fundamental to sustaining the health and productivity of America’s longleaf pine ecosystems. Improved understanding of the basic physiology of longleaf pine and its native understory plant communities and how they interact with the environment remains a crucial need.

Container-Grown Longleaf Pine Seedlings
Container-Grown Longleaf Pine Seedlings

Information on Knowing When to Cull Seedlings, Reducing Lateral Root Deformity, Improving Early Field Performance, etc.

Longleaf Pine Regeneration and Pro-B Method for Selection Silviculture
Longleaf Pine Regeneration and Pro-B Method for Selection Silviculture

Although longleaf pine was known in the past for erratic seed production and poor seedling survival, knowledge gained through research in recent decades has greatly increased regeneration success. Periodic regeneration, preferably by natural means and if necessary by artificial approaches, is essential for the sustainable management of longleaf pine forests.

Longleaf Pine Restoration and Hurricane Recovery
Longleaf Pine Restoration and Hurricane Recovery

Ecological restoration is “an intentional activity that initiates or accelerates the recovery of an ecosystem with respect to its health, integrity and sustainability.” Restoration’s principal goal is to improve (and reestablish where necessary) the composition, structure and functions of an ecosystem, so that its productivity, diversity and many life‐support processes or “ecosystem services” will be sustained to benefit present and future generations

Longleaf Pine Silvopasture
Longleaf Pine Silvopasture

Many landowners are seeking alternative production systems that increase the profitability of their lands while allowing the property to remain in forests. Silvopasture is one such system. It combines growing high value timber with forage and domesticated animal production. Many landowners are seeking alternative production systems that increase the profitability of their lands while allowing the property to remain in forests. Silvopasture is one such system. It combines growing high value timber with forage and domesticated animal production.

Native Groundcover Restoration
Native Groundcover Restoration

The longleaf pine (LLP) ecosystem includes some of the most species-rich plant communities outside the tropics, and most of that diversity is in the groundcover vegetation. The groundcover harbors many rare plant species, enhances the habitat for resident fauna, and produces fuel needed to carry surface fires that perpetuate the system. A vigorous and continuous groundcover facilitates the use of prescribed fire, one of the most effective and economical methods for achieving landowner objectives. Restoring the groundcover is increasingly cited as a management objective.

Palustris Experimental Forest - A Focus on Longleaf Pine
Palustris Experimental Forest - A Focus on Longleaf Pine

A informational brochure on the Palustris Experimental Forest, including information on the major Tracts and Emphases.

Pitcher Plant Seed Research
Pitcher Plant Seed Research

There are eight species of the pitcher plant genus Sarracenia in North America, seven of which can be found in the Gulf Coast region of the United States. They grow in bogs and in wet longleaf pine savannahs. The plants are carnivorous, trapping insects in hollow, water. Conservation and restoration efforts require further study of Sarracenia seed biology and ecology.

Prescribed Fire - A Necessary Management Tool for Longleaf Pine
Prescribed Fire - A Necessary Management Tool for Longleaf Pine

The Longleaf Pine/Bluestem Range once extended from northwestern Florida and southern Alabama to eastern Texas in 1935. Uncontrolled harvesting denuded most of this range, and wildfires, overgrazing by livestock, and foraging by feral hogs kept natural pine regeneration from restocking these lands. Longleaf pine management became possible only after feral hogs were controlled, other livestock placed under management, and fire use restrained. Where a seed source was available, longleaf pine was now able to regenerate naturally, and the seedlings grew where prescribed fires were routinely applied.

Resilience of Longleaf Pine Saplings After Stem Displacement Depends on Their Root System Architecture
Resilience of Longleaf Pine Saplings After Stem Displacement Depends on Their Root System Architecture

Unit scientists are testing the effect of container cavity type and size on the root development and stem displacement of longleaf pine. Naturally and artificially regenerated longleaf pine trees were excavated to assess their root system architecture in relation to stem stability.

The Root-Soil Interface - Insight and Support
The Root-Soil Interface - Insight and Support

The sustainability of southern pines depends on continuous expansion of the root system and mycorrhizal network. This is especially true for longleaf pine which, among the southern pines, is the most tolerant of infertile sites and drought. Consequently, it is often the dominant pine in harsh settngs.

Sustaining Longleaf Pine Vigor
Sustaining Longleaf Pine Vigor

Before the era of its harvest and replacement, longleaf pine was found on an array of sites from the rich soils now used to grow commercial loblolly and slash pines to the less fertile and often dry soils of many public lands. Today, most longleaf forests are found where other pines cannot be sustained. The ability of longleaf pine to thrive where other pine species fail attests to its tolerance of difficult conditions.

Restoring and Managing Longleaf Pine Ecosystems Unit Brochure
Restoring and Managing Longleaf Pine Ecosystems Unit Brochure

Information about the Unit and Unit Scientists.