Restoration of a severely impacted riparian wetland system - The Pen Branch Project

  • Author(s): Barton, Christopher; Nelson, Eric A.; Kolka, Randall K.; McLeod, Kenneth W.; Conner, William H.; Lakly, Michelle; Martin, Douglas; Wigginton, John; Trettin, Carl C.; Wisniewski, Joe
  • Date: 2000
  • Station ID: Miscellaneous Publication-SRS-

Abstract

The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC (Fig. 1). Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50% baldcypress-water tupelo stands, 40% mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10% shrub, marsh, and open water. Tributeries of the river were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp and by flooding of the Savannah River. Upstream dams on the Savannah River have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain (Schneider et al., 1989).

  • Citation: Barton, Christopher; Nelson, Eric A.; Kolka, Randall K.; McLeod, Kenneth W.; Conner, William H.; Lakly, Michelle; Martin, Douglas; Wigginton, John; Trettin, Carl C.; Wisniewski, Joe 2000. Restoration of a severely impacted riparian wetland system - The Pen Branch Project. Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) S3-S15

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