Impacts of emerald ash borer-induced tree mortality on leaf litter arthropods and exotic earthworms

  • Author(s): Ulyshen, Michael D.; Klooster, Wendy S.; Barrington, William T.; Herns, Daniel A.
  • Date: 2011
  • Source: Pedobiologia-International Journal of Soil Biology 54:261-265

Abstract

Because leaf litter occurs at the interface between the soil and atmosphere, the invertebrates inhabiting it represent important linkages between above- and below-ground food webs. The responses of these organisms to forest disturbance brought about by invasive species should therefore have far-reaching ecological effects. The purpose of this study was to explore how canopy gap formation (gap fraction 1–10%) and fallen ash trees (“logs”) resulting from extensive (>99%) ash tree mortality caused by the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) affect the distributions of litter-dwelling arthropods and earthworms. These organisms did not vary in abundance across the gap fraction range studied but, as predicted from the literature, many taxa (e.g., Aranea, Coleoptera, Collembola, Diplopoda, Isopoda, Opiliones and exotic earthworms) were more abundant next to logs than away from them. Contrary to expectations, arthropods did not become more concentrated next to logs as canopy openness increased, with isopods exhibiting the opposite response. These results suggest litter-dwelling arthropods in EAB-infested forests are favored by inputs of ash wood to the forest floor but are largely unaffected by increases in canopy openness, at least across the gap fraction range studied.

  • Citation: Ulyshen, Michael D.; Klooster, Wendy S.; Barrington, William T.; Herns, Daniel A. 2011. Impacts of emerald ash borer-induced tree mortality on leaf litter arthropods and exotic earthworms. Pedobiologia-International Journal of Soil Biology 54:261-265.

Requesting Print Publications

Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

Publication Notes

  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
  • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.