Structure and regrowth of longleaf pine forests following uneven-aged silviculture and hurricane disturbance at the Escambia Experimental Forest

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  • Authors: Bohn, Kimberly; Chancy, Christel; Brockway, Dale
  • Publication Year: 2015
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: In: Holley, A. Gordon; Connor, Kristina F.; Haywood, James D., eds. Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203, Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 372-373.

Abstract

In recent decades, considerable attention has been placed on restoring and managing longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystems across the southeastern United States. Although, historically, these forests have been successfully regenerated following even-aged shelterwood reproduction methods, uneven-aged silviculture has received increasing attention because it is thought to meet a diversity objectives including timber production, biodiversity enhancement, and habitat conservation and is also thought to emulate some of the natural disturbance regimes that have historically sustained these ecosystems.

  • Citation: Bohn, Kimberly; Chancy, Christel; Brockway, Dale. 2015. Structure and regrowth of longleaf pine forests following uneven-aged silviculture and hurricane disturbance at the Escambia Experimental Forest. In: Holley, A. Gordon; Connor, Kristina F.; Haywood, James D., eds. Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203, Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 372-373.
  • Keywords: longleaf pine, Pinus palustris, uneven-aged silviculture, Escambia Experimental Forest
  • Posted Date: February 11, 2015
  • Modified Date: March 3, 2015
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