Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) and hardwood regeneration after thinning natural shortleaf pine forests in southern United States

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Author(s): KC, Anup; Lynch, Thomas B.; Guldin, James M.
  • Date: 2016
  • Station ID: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)-SRS-212

Abstract

Understory pine and hardwood regeneration in the Ozark and Ouachita National Forests were measured in 1995 for the first time following thinning and hardwood control at plot establishment 1985-87. Red maple (Acer rubrum), shortleaf pine and flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) were the most frequently recorded species. Understory shortleaf pine stems have declined consistently since 1995. The binomial logistic regression model showed that site index and overstory shortleaf pine basal area were negatively related to shortleaf pine regeneration (P<0.05). Overstory shortleaf pine thinning may initiate shortleaf pine regeneration at early stage; however, newly regenerated hardwood species will dominate the entire regeneration process long-term, if hardwood control treatments are not applied.

  • Citation: KC, Anup; Lynch, Thomas B.; Guldin, James M. 2016. Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) and hardwood regeneration after thinning natural shortleaf pine forests in southern United States. In: Schweitzer, Callie J.; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Oswalt, Christopher M., eds. Proceedings of the 18th biennial southern silvicultural research conference; 2015 March 2-5; Knoxville, TN.  e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-212. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 553-554. 2 p.

Requesting Print Publications

Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

Publication Notes

  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
  • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.