Recruiting oak using midstory herbicide shelterwood prescriptions in Cumberland Plateu forests in Alabama, Tennessee, and Kentucky

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Schweitzer, C.J.
  • Publication Year: 2019
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-237. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

Abstract

I examined the implementation of a midstory herbicide treatment as the first phase in a two-phase shelterwood prescription in upland hardwood stands in Alabama, Tennessee, and Kentucky. The initial prescription for all three sites was similar: use herbicide to reduce the density of the midstory, allowing increased light to the established oak (Quercus spp.) reproduction. The goal was to increase understory light to at least 20 percent of full sun to promote oak seedling growth and recruitment over other species. Light was increased, but ephemeral and not to the 20-percent full sun goal. Densities of large oak seedlings [>4 feet in height up to 1.5 inches diameter at breast height (dbh)] increased only on the Kentucky site, which had the most advance oak reproduction of all three sites prior to treatment. Response of competitors, including shade-tolerant sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), intolerant yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), and ubiquitous red maple (A. rubrum L.), also responded. Treating small stems (<1 inch dbh) and other tending treatments prior to overstory may be warranted to maintain oak.

  • Citation: Schweitzer, C.J. 2019. Recruiting oak using midstory herbicide shelterwood prescriptions in Cumberland Plateu forests in Alabama, Tennessee, and Kentucky. In: Clark, S.L.; Schweitzer, C.J., eds. Oak symposium: sustaining oak forests in the 21st century through science-based management. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-237. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 51-61.
  • Posted Date: June 11, 2019
  • Modified Date: June 18, 2019
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.