Morphological, anatomical and physiological traits of Euryodendron excelsum as affected by conservation translocation (augmentation vs. conservation introduction) in South China

  • Authors: REN, H.; YI, H.L.; ZHANG, Q.M.; WANG, J.; WEN, X.Y.; GUO, Q.F.; LIU, H.
  • Publication Year: 2019
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Photosynthetica
  • DOI: 10.32615/ps.2019.024

Abstract

Euryodendron excelsum is a rare and endangered evergreen tree in South China. We conducted two experimental translocations (augmentation and conservation introduction) on this species and assessed morphological, anatomical and physiological traits of leaves after translocation. The introduction plants showed smaller specific leaf area, less developed palisade tissues, smaller palisade/spongy tissue ratio, stomata density and anthocyanin content, lower values of maximal quantum yield of PSII photochemistry, photochemical quenching coefficient, net photosynthetic rate, light-saturated net photosynthetic rate, light-saturation point, but higher light-compensation point. These differences in traits help explain why augmented plants grew faster than introduced plants. We found that E. excelsum can adapt to wide ranges of light intensity and water availability, including conditions encountered at the introduction site. Our findings suggest that some endemic and endangered plants with narrow distribution may adapt to different habitat conditions by rapidly altering their morphological, anatomical, and physiological traits.

  • Citation: REN, H.; YI, H.L.; ZHANG, Q.M.; WANG, J.; WEN, X.Y.; GUO, Q.F.; LIU, H. 2019. Morphological, anatomical and physiological traits of Euryodendron excelsum as affected by conservation translocation (augmentation vs. conservation introduction) in South China. Photosynthetica. 57(1): 217-225. https://doi.org/10.32615/ps.2019.024.
  • Keywords: assisted colonisation, morphological response, physiological response, reintroduction
  • Posted Date: September 17, 2019
  • Modified Date: September 18, 2019
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.