Chapter 14: Impact of Bark Beetle Infestation on Fuel Loads and Fire Behavior in “Old-Stage” Southwestern Ponderosa Pine (Project INT-EM-F-12-02)

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Hansen, Matt; Johnson, Morris; Bentz, Barbara; Vandygriff, Jim; Munson, A. Steven
  • Publication Year: 2019
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: In: Potter, Kevin M.; Conkling, Barbara L., eds. 2016. Forest health monitoring: national status, trends, and analysis 2015. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-213. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 226 p.

Abstract

Bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, sf. Scolytinae) infestations modify fuels and, consequently, modeled fire behavior in conifer ecosystems of the Western United States (Hicke and others 2012, Jenkins and others 2014). Changes in fuels will vary with space and time since infestation, and impacts on fire behavior will be correspondingly complex (Simard and others 2011). Multiple studies have focused on quantifying fuels and modeled or observed fire behavior in currently infested (known as “red-stage” because killed trees still retain fading yellow-red needles) and recently infested (known as “gray-stage” because all needles have fallen, revealing the tree boles and branches) pine stands, particularly in lodgepole pine type (Pinus contorta). Less research has been conducted in “old-stage” stands (wherein beetle-killed trees have mostly fallen, the fallen needles have mostly decomposed, and advance regeneration forms ladder fuels), especially for relatively arid types such as ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) (Hicke and others 2012).

  • Citation: Hansen, E. Matthew; Johnson, Morris C.; Bentz, Barbara J.; Vandygriff, James C.; Munson, A. Steven. 2016. Chapter 14: Impact of Bark Beetle Infestation on Fuel Loads and Fire Behavior in “Old-Stage” Southwestern Ponderosa Pine (Project INT-EM-F-12-02). Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-213. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 8 p.
  • Posted Date: September 19, 2019
  • Modified Date: September 19, 2019
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.